Mountain Biking Grading System

Mountain Biking Grading System

For those who know what they're doing on single-track. You don't have to be an expert, though, and these are often good trips if you want to develop your skills. Fast, technical, narrow trails make up a large amount of the itinerary, though there will also be plenty of vehicle-width stuff as well, and some short tarmac linking sections. There is usually much less vehicle support than on the cross-country rides. 

Grades: 
Factors affecting grading include: degree of up/down, difficulty of the surfaces to be ridden, amount of bike handling skill required, distances covered and other factors such as heat, altitude or remoteness. All our trips require basic fitness, preferably acquired through riding your bike, and please remember that any cycling involves some physical exertion, so you cannot expect that you will not feel tired on an 'easy' trip. NB Conditions for a particular holiday may vary from one month to the next. The main benefit of grading is to provide an overall indicator to compare one trip against another. 

A. Easy - Suitable for anyone who can ride a bike and can manage a bit of exercise. No routes are 100% flat, so expect some climbs and descents. 

B. Moderate - Ideal for occasional cyclists and above, or a relaxing trip for better riders. Reasonable fitness required such as cycling, hard walking or similar once or twice a week. 

C. Strenuous - Suitable for fit & confident riders. Fitness is more important than ethnical ability for trips of this level, and some specific training or preparation is recommended, e.g. running, cycling, swimming or aerobics two to three times a week (preferably cycling!) 

D. Tough - Long cycling days and tougher terrain (for both on- and off-road trips) requiring specific experience of more demanding and technical cycling. Vehicle support may be more limited. You should be very confident of your physical condition and bike handling skills. 

E. Very Tough - Experienced, fit cyclists and above who are happy to undertake a more expedition-style tour. Off-road experience is essential, including riding on rough, steep surfaces and single-track. Itineraries will include long cycling days in hot conditions with basic facilities; altitude along with carrying a bike may also contribute to this grade. High level of fitness required, achieved through regular aerobic training. 

Food Key in Nepal

MEAL

The meal inclusions are marked below each day's trip note:

B: Breakfast

L: Lunch

D: Dinner             

On this trip included are all breakfasts, 10 lunches and 7dinners.

Food Key in Tibet

MEAL

The meal inclusions are marked below each day's trip note:

B: Breakfast

L: Lunch

D: Dinner             

On this trip included are all breakfasts, 10 lunches and 7dinners.

Accommodation Key - Tibet

The entry in bold at the end of each day indicates the type of accommodation normally used.

CH: Comfortable Hotel, Lodge- twin rooms with en suite facilities, reliable electricity and     water supply, good service and some added amenities

SH: Standard Hotel, Lodge or Gite - no-frills hotel, usually with twin rooms and en suite facilities. Service and amenities are generally adequate.

BH: Basic Hotel, Lodge or Gite, Mountain Hut, Village House - Can be communal, often consisting of just a bed and shared facilities. Bed linen not normally provided. Running water, toilets and electricity may be inconsistent or non-existent. Cleanliness is not always assured.

C Camping. In Rongbuk the accommodation is a seasonal tented camp.  The tents are spacious and well equipped 8 people sized ones, which come with dormitory style single beds, solid flooring and a central heating stove.

Single Accommodation: If you wish to have a single room, a single supplement of US$ 450 is payable at time of booking. Some of the places along the route only provide dormitory rooms, so single rooms cannot be expected every night. Please check day to day itinerary for more information.

Unmatched Accommodation: In case of any unmatched clients, they will straight be categorized to the Single Supplement category and added to the Final Invoice.

Note: Total extra costs will be added to the final invoice.

Note: Please be known that our accommodations are not disabling friendly.

Accommodation Key - Nepal

The entry in bold at the end of each day indicates the type of accommodation normally used.
 
CH: Comfortable Hotel, Lodge- twin rooms with en suite facilities, reliable electricity and     water supply, good service and some added amenities
SH: Standard Hotel, Lodge or Gite - no-frills hotel, usually with twin rooms and en suite facilities. Service and amenities are generally adequate.
BH: Basic Hotel, Lodge or Gite, Mountain Hut, Village House - Can be communal, often consisting of just a bed and shared facilities. Bed linen not normally provided. Running water, toilets and electricity may be inconsistent or non-existent. Cleanliness is not always assured.
 
C: Camping. In Trisuli River the accommodation is a seasonal tented camp.  The dome tents are spacious and well equipped 2 people sized ones.

Single Accommodation: If you wish to have a single room, a single supplement of US$ 450 is payable at time of booking. Some of the places along the route only provide dormitory rooms, so single rooms cannot be expected every night. Please check day to day itinerary for more information.
 
Unmatched Accommodation: In case of any unmatched clients, they will straight be categorized to the Single Supplement category and added to the Final Invoice.
 
Note: Total extra costs will be added to the final invoice. 
 
Note: Please be known that our accommodations are not disabling friendly.

Biking clothes-Parts-Extra-Items

Clients have to prepare with warm clothes for the autumn season i.e. October, November.  The winter season i.e. December, January and February. Around March the temperature rises pretty much so they can get their summer clothing with few light jackets.

 BICYLING CLOTHES
1.    T-shirts (cotton and short sleeved) 
2.    Long sleeve shirt or light pullover (Polypropylene is recommended)
3.    Jacket
4.    Sleeping bag (For Tibet tour) 
5.    Cycling shorts long and short both needed for the unexpected weather.
6.    Windbreaker with a hood and wind trousers (make sure the material is  “Breathable” for exercise
7.    Cycling Socks 
8.    Cycling shoes or Sports shoe
9.    Cycling gloves full and half for the unexpected weather
10.    Hat – suitable for cycling and sun protection.
11.    Micro-sensor Headband
12.    Helmet
13.    Cycling Glass

SPARE BIKE PARTS
1.    Inner tube
2.    Tire
3.    Puncture kit
4.    Brake shoe
5.    Mini-repair tools
6.    Brake & gear wire 
7.    Bike oil
8.    Brush 
9.    Disc brake kits

Note: If anybody brings a bike with Magura brakes or any other new system in Disk brake, he/she should bring all the necessary repair kit and spare parts along with the tools. 

OTHER CLOTHES 

EXTRA ITEMS 
1.    Sun glasses 
2.    Suntan block or lotion
3.    Personal medication 
4.    Camera and films
5.    Flash light / torch 
6.    Plastic bags for wet cloths 
7.    Needle, thread, and safety pins
8.    Binoculars
9.    Mask for dust
10.    Water-bottle or Camelback
11.    Power bars & your choice of dry food
12.    Suggest carrying spare warm cloths/Rain gear.

International River Classifications by difficulty

Class 1:   Easy
Moving water with occasional small rapids. Few or no obstacles.

Class 2:   Moderate
Small rapids with regular waves. Some maneuvering required but easy to navigate.

Class 3:   Difficult
Rapids with regular waves and hazards that need avoiding. More difficult maneuvering required but routes are normally obvious.

Class 4:   Very difficult
Large rapids that require careful maneuvering. Technical difficulty with turbulent water and large irregular waves.

Class 5:   Extremely difficult
Long and continuous rapids, powerful waves and needs precise maneuvering. Scouting from the shore is essential.

Class 6:   Nearly impossible
Waterfalls and impossible accessibility makes it very hazardous to maneuver and navigate impossible. 

Road Rules in Nepal ad hints for safe riding

Road Rules in Nepal ad hints for safe riding

•    Always wear a correctly adjusted helmet and gloves.
•    In Nepal people drive on the LEFT hand side of the road. Overtaking is from the RIGHT as in the UK.
•     ride at a speed you are comfortable with. Do not ride beyond your abilities. If a stretch is too technical get off and walk.
•    Keep your own pace. Do not compete with other. 
•    Always ride with one other person in case you get into difficulties
•    We usually have one guide at the front and one behind so will stop at junctions to regroup
•    Always stop at junctions, unless specifically told not to by the guide. If in doubt where the group is stop.
•    If you get lost either wait where you are or go to the last place you last saw the group.
•    The support vehicle will usually drive behind us
•    Give other riders plenty of space especially on off road and downhill sections
•    Check brake before every start, Also check gear in right position     
•    The person in front has right of way and may not be aware of what the person behind is doing, so if overtaking let the person in front know and shout ‘coming through on the right’ (Always overtake from right) 
•    Know the final destination, carry your trip notes (and map if you have been given one) and the leader card with contact numbers on (day to day details with contact number)
•    Always make sure you have water and drink plenty especially in spring season when it can be very hot and humid in the lowlands. Carry emergency energy snacks.
•    If you get chased by a dog, stop and put the bike between you and the dog.
•     Make sure your bike is set up properly (eg saddle height) and check brakes every day
•    Concentrate on the road or track ahead. Don’t wave or take photos or drink whilst cycling. If you want to enjoy the view stop
•    Use your gears frequently to maintain a comfortable and constant peddling rate. Lower gears are sustainable for a longer period than slow revs in a higher gear. Anticipate gear changes in advance, especially when climbing a hill or approaching an obstacle.
•    Be aware of the position of your feet when going round corners; on a RIGHT hand bend have left foot down and on a LEFT hand bend have right foot down
•    Be aware of your body position on the bike and how to alter it for up and downhill eg moving your bottom back off the seat and gripping the seat between your legs on steep downhill sections maintains stability and lean forward and hold handlebars lightly on steep uphill sections.
•    Use both brakes simultaneously and control speed by letting them on and off frequently rather than holding them on all the time. Brake before corners – not on the corner.
•    In soft sand or gravel, change down a gear, move your weight back and aim in a straight line
•    If hiring a bike bring your own comfortable saddle that you know (and peddles)
    
Happy Trails

Road Rules in Tibet and hints of safe riding

Road Rules in Tibet and hints of safe riding


•    Always wear a correctly adjusted helmet and gloves.
•    In the Tibet people drive on the RIGHT hand side of the road. Overtaking is from the LEFT as in the US.
•    ride at a speed you are comfortable with. Do not ride beyond your abilities. If a stretch is too technical get off and walk.
•    Keep your own pace. Do not compete with other. 
•    Always ride with one other person in case you get into difficulties
•    We usually have one guide at the front and one behind so will stop at junctions to regroup
•    Always stop at junctions, unless specifically told not to by the guide. If in doubt where the group is stop.
•    If you get lost either wait where you are or go to the last place you last saw the group.
•    The support vehicle will usually drive behind us
•    Give other riders plenty of space especially on off road and downhill sections
•    Check brake before every start, Also check gear in right position     
•    The person in front has right of way and may not be aware of what the person behind is doing, so if overtaking let the person in front know and shout ‘coming through on the right’ (Always overtake from right) 
•    Know the final destination, carry your trip notes (and map if you have been given one) and the leader card with contact numbers on (day to day details with contact number)
•    Always make sure you have water and drink plenty especially in spring season when it can be very hot and humid in the lowlands. Carry emergency energy snacks.
•    If you get chased by a dog, stop and put the bike between you and the dog.
•     Make sure your bike is set up properly (eg saddle height) and check brakes every day
•    Concentrate on the road or track ahead. Don’t wave or take photos or drink whilst cycling. If you want to enjoy the view stop
•    Use your gears frequently to maintain a comfortable and constant peddling rate. Lower gears are sustainable for a longer period than slow revs in a higher gear. Anticipate gear changes in advance, especially when climbing a hill or approaching an obstacle.
•    Be aware of the position of your feet when going round corners; on a RIGHT hand bend have left foot down and on a LEFT hand bend have right foot down
•    Be aware of your body position on the bike and how to alter it for up and downhill eg moving your bottom back off the seat and gripping the seat between your legs on steep downhill sections maintains stability and lean forward and hold handlebars lightly on steep uphill sections.
•    Use both brakes simultaneously and control speed by letting them on and off frequently rather than holding them on all the time. Brake before corners – not on the corner.
•    In soft sand or gravel, change down a gear, move your weight back and aim in a straight line
•    If hiring a bike bring your own comfortable saddle that you know (and peddles)
    
Happy Trails

 

What is the tour grading system ?

TRIP CLASSIFICATION & GRADING

Each holiday is classified with a category and grade; these are explained below. Please also read the 'Trip profile' on the trip pages, and the 'Cycling Conditions' section of the Trip Notes to get a complete idea of what the holiday involves. If you are in any doubt about your suitability, be it through inexperience or even over-experience, please call us for a chat.

Categories

Self-guided

These are easy-going trips where there is no group or leader, so you are   free to spend as much time as you like cycling, admiring the view or relaxing. You simply follow the route notes provided, adding your own detours as you wish. Luggage is transported for you each day, and you can travel by yourself, with just one or two friends, or with your children. There are more Self-guided trips described in our Destinations brochure, and on our website www.exodus.co.uk.

Road:

Itineraries are based at least 90% on tarmac, which may be in perfect condition or potholed and broken. There may be occasional short sections on unsurfaced routes to visit a particular point of interest or to avoid having to transfer in the support vehicle.

Cross Country: 

These trips follow mainly vehicle-width dirt roads, which may be smooth, gritty, stony, rocky, rutted, loose or hard-packed. The tracks will rise and fall over undulating, hilly and mountainous terrain, but single-track riding will not be included in the main itinerary (optional bits are often possible). Some experience of off-road riding is advisable before booking, but the amount recommended will vary from trip to trip.

Mountain Biking:

For those who know what they're doing on single-track. You don't have to be an expert, though, and these are often good trips if you want to develop your skills. Fast, technical, narrow trails make up a large amount of the itinerary, though there will also be plenty of vehicle-width stuff as well, and some short tarmac linking sections. There is usually much less vehicle support than on the cross-country rides.

Grades:

Factors affecting grading include: degree of up/down, difficulty of the surfaces to be ridden, amount of bike handling skill required, distances covered and other factors such as heat, altitude or remoteness. All our trips require basic fitness, preferably acquired through riding your bike, and please remember that any cycling involves some physical exertion, so you cannot expect that you will not feel tired on an 'easy' trip. NB Conditions for a particular holiday may vary from one month to the next. The main benefit of grading is to provide an overall indicator to compare one trip against another.

A. Easy - Suitable for anyone who can ride a bike and can manage a bit of exercise. No routes are 100% flat, so expect some climbs and descents.

B. Moderate - Ideal for occasional cyclists and above, or a relaxing trip for better riders. Reasonable fitness required such as cycling, hard walking or similar once or twice a week.

C. Strenuous - Suitable for fit & confident riders. Fitness is more important than ethnical ability for trips of this level, and some specific training or preparation is recommended, e.g. running, cycling, swimming or aerobics two to three times a week (preferably cycling!)

D. Tough - Long cycling days and tougher terrain (for both on- and off-road trips) requiring specific experience of more demanding and technical cycling. Vehicle support may be more limited. You should be very confident of your physical condition and bike handling skills.

E. Very Tough - Experienced, fit cyclists and above who are happy to undertake a more expedition-style tour. Off-road experience is essential, including riding on rough, steep surfaces and single-track. Itineraries will include long cycling days in hot conditions with basic facilities; altitude may also contribute to this grade. High level of fitness required, achieved through regular aerobic training.

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